Monday, 22 April 2013

Tiny Treads by Joeli Caparco

Right out the gate I want to say this is a long overdue review and feature. I had plans to interview the oh so talented Ms Caparco but you know, babies happen. I still predict this in my podcasting future but in the meantime I've been dying to share this because it's such a good bit of work. Let me tell you why.

(c) Cooperative Press
Tiny Treads features 12 sock patterns for infants and children by a mother who knows her knit stuff. It's packed full of practical tips from how to get little ones to wash their own handwash socks (oh yes) to sizing for different tiny feet. What makes this super practical is that it's written by someone who is a whizz tech editor so the patterns just make sense. This is what happens when good editors design: the patterns are thoughtfully and carefully produced with that critical eye for detail.

With tiny feet, it might be tricky to measure, get gauge, get the correct size and yarns and so on, especially if you want to use a partially leftover skein rather than break into a beloved whole skein of deliciousness. The solution is simple: Joeli provides options for whatever gauge you are knitting at. That's genius quite frankly and so much more practical for busy mum's who've grabbed yarn and a 5 minute knitting time out and don't have time to perfectly match yarn.

Gepetto, (c) Cooperative Press
As for the designs themselves, they're practical, fun and make good use of a range of yarns. There's slippers, leg warmers, socks and different weights of yarn so you can find some good foot solutions in here. As someone who baby wears everyday, I predict a lot of these in my future knitting. I also like the fact that it's produced by Cooperative Press, so has clear layout and availability both in print and digitally. It ticks all the right boxes for me when I'm looking for new pattern collections.

Banbury Cross, (c) Cooperative Press
A few highlights I particularly liked were 'Gepetto' legwarmers: a worsted weight pair of cabled leggies that I know I'll be casting on. Also, I loved the 'grown upness' of Banbury Cross socks, a sockweight ribbed pattern that I should imagine work super fast for teeny feet. I am also completely charmed and intrigued in equal measure by these Cinderslippers in two colours of Sock weight. Aren't they cute?

(c) Cooperative Press
If you like mini knits and mini feet and would like the chance to win a digital copy of Joeli's book, please leave a comment below telling me which of the designs you would most likely knit first. The random number generator will select a winner on the 29th April 2013 and announced here on the blog. Good luck!

Of course if you can't wait that long, you can always purchase your copy here or simply check out more of the fab designs in this book.

20 comments:

Fruitful Fusion said...

I'm such a beginner when it comes to socks, I'd definitely start with the basic toe up in that cute little baby size and then work my way up to the other lovely patterns!

Not So Granny said...

I have 3 little pairs of feet to knit for and I think I'd probably start with a toe up recipe for speed. I think my daughter would like contrary cockleshells though and the name certainly suits her mood at the moment - toddlers!

Tracey said...

gepetto for sure! Although I think once I start I won't stop there. I have three small kids that never stop asking for hand knits. No matter what it is...hats, gloves, stuffies. They love them all! Thanks for the chance to win this WONDERFUL prize! Tbmccarthy on rav

Hannah Mahler said...

Too cute! A friend just asked me for leg warmers, so those would be first on the needles :-)

Vicki Yelland-Browning said...

I love the Banbury socks; my boys are both after handknit socks!!! I am knitting on Ravelry xx

Wings from the Marsh said...

Such a handy book! I think this is the perfect book to gather up the courage and knit some socks for my 3 year old! I think I would begin with Cinderslippers! They are amazing!

wingsfromthemarsh on Ravelry

Laura Blinn said...

What a great idea! It's about time someone has done something like this! I find myself wishing, however, that I could make the cinderslippers for myself! They are my favorite and would definitely be the first I would cast on!

Nina said...

My daughter wears lots of leggings up here in the cold north, so I think that the gepettos would be first on the list. Lovely.

Judith Korving said...

I would probably start with the legwarmers as my little Bubs refuses to keep his socks on for longer than 5 minutes... And then maybe attach a sock to the bottom of the legwarmers...

Jessica Powers said...

I want a pair of cinderslippers for me! Those are adorable! Sounds like the sort of book I'd like - I'm stalling knitting socks for little people I know due to sizing issues!

Sheralynn said...

These socks are just so sweet!! I just love Banbury Cross. I love how the socks are so gender neutral as well, lovely lovely work, Joeli!!

Unknown said...

Definitely Cinderslippers!

Unknown said...

I would start with Cindrslippers.

Sarah Beverton said...

I'd try Pied piper first, my Daughter is super fussy about socks, she has 3 airs that she'll wear and one of them looks like pied piper.

Kesha E said...

I too like the banbury cross!!

Anne Ă…bom Dahl said...

I could definitely see myself knitting all of them, but I would begin with Golden Midas for my son (just because I love cables) and Cinderslippers for my daughter, though she might insist on them being purple and pink...

Suuf (Ravelry)

Sabrina said...

How cute! I like them all, but would probably knit Gepetto first off for my nephew!

bean1082 (Ravelry)

Karen said...

This book is wonderful - I would definitely knit the Cinderslippers first and then work my way through the rest in the book. Cooperative Press is fantastic.

yarnandpointysticks.com said...

I definitely need to knit some of those gorgeous leg warmers for baby wearing during winter, the cool mornings are starting to make a regular appearance round these parts.

Great review of a great book.

melosa said...

I really love Banbury Cross, but many of the sock patterns look like they would get a lot of wear around our house.